Here is a 2013 article about Marianne McNeil Logan and selected poems from her book, Moments in Morning. The article is from Amarillo Southwest Life Magazine, which is no longer in existence. 

Amarillo Author

a Treasure

 

Marianne McNeil Logan’s publications will make you

laugh and cry through her life stories.

by Danny Mize

Community contributor

 

When you see “Moments

in Mourning,” the book of poetry

by Amarillo author Marianne

McNeil Logan, you may dismiss

it because of its small size or title.

After all, who wants to read about

grief—even if it is small enough

to tuck into a purse or carry in

your pocket?

 

Give it a chance! The 60-page book

traces her journey with her husband’s

illness and decline into the pain of grief

upon his death in 1991, after 42 years

of marriage. The reader witnesses her

transition from mourning to hope with

thoughts of, “I’m taking off my wedding

rings, to pack them carefully away with

other sentimental things.”

 

 

There’s a message to Grant, her deceased

husband: “I stand atop our small

white bridge where haunting shadows

lie; I promised if my life would change,

I’d come to tell you why.” Then, she

writes about finding her second chance

at romance with a lonely widower who

came into her life.

 

In March 1994, she married that

lonely widower, Claude Logan, of Dumas.

They spent much time traveling to

writing seminars and “cowboy gatherings,”

where she was often a scheduled

speaker. Her joy turned to grief once

again when Claude died in October of

2012, while Marianne was having cancer

surgery on her eyelid.

 

Unable to focus on writing during

Claude’s illness and death, Marianne

found herself in a two-and-a-half year

writer’s dry spell. Recognizing everyone’s

need to engage in laughter, she

published “The Worth of Mirth: Poetry

for Those Who Love To Laugh and

Those Who Need To” late last year.

 

C:\Users\John\Pictures\The_Worth_of_Mirth_Cover_for_Kindle (2).jpg

 

This was a project she had begun and

put aside 15 years earlier. It was as if it

“waited” until she needed it to help save

her sanity.

 

Readers will smile through family

stories and laugh through sections about

each of her husbands. Wait until you

see the “Cowboy Lingo” section, which

wraps up the book.

 

Marianne McNeil Logan is a much loved

poet and a local treasure. She is a

councilor-at-large for the Poetry Society

of Texas, and has organized many writing

activities for the Panhandle area

writers. She helped establish cowboy

poetry in the Panhandle: Old West Days,

as well as monthly breakfasts held at the

Big Texan (now at the Country Barn).

She founded and moderated the Senior

Citizens group for 20 years. Fifty-six

members were published. She founded

the Tri-State Fair Literary Contest,

has encouraged area poets in readings

on KGNC for National Poetry Day,

promoted poetry readings at the Amarillo

Art Center, set up poetry displays

at “Taste the Arts,” and organized many

cowboy poetry programs in neighboring

communities.

 

Marianne Logan has won over

2,000 poetry contest awards. Three of

her books have garnered five national

awards, two receiving Pulitzer Prize

nominations. Her favorite cowboy poem,

“Someone, Somewhere” is on Youtube.

“Won’t someone help me find a friend

in the old-time cowboy style, who’s

thoughtful, gentle, mannerly, with the

devil in his smile?”

 

She has been awarded the prestigious

Hilton Ross Greer Award by the Poetry

Society of Texas, the Heritage Award by

the Southwest Cowboy Poetry Association,

and the Lifetime Award from the

Poetry Society of Texas and Texas Hi-Plains

Writers.

 

“The Worth of Mirth” is available at Hastings

Bookstore on 45th in Amarillo, “Moments

in Mourning” is at Amazon-Kindle, and both

are available through PayPal at PathPublishing.com.

You will be impressed with her work

and proud that she is a local writer.

 

Danny Mize is the Bereavement

Coordinator and Chaplain at the

Hospice Care of the Southwest. Visit

hospicesouthwest.com for more info.

 

Danny Mize

Bereavement Coordinator and Chaplain

Hospice Care of the Southwest

Offices inside Childers Place

6600 Killgore Drive, Suite 110

Amarillo, TX 79106

Direct: 806-350-8274

 

Marianne McNeil Logan is an Amarillo native who helps others through the grieving process through her writing. “Moments in Mourning” is her poetic journey of mourning the death of her husband and life afterwards. Read about each of her husbands in “The Worth of Mirth.”

by Megan Douress

Editor

 

  

Poems from Moments in Mourning —

A guide to the healing of grief

 

A survivor after losing a mate of 42 years, Marianne McNeil Logan, a well-known rhyming poet, gently leads the reader through unexpected stages of losing a loved one and into the light, discovering a new life is still possible. A poet with many accolades, her chapbooks have garnered five national awards and two Pulitzer Prize nominations, including one for this book.

 

If you would like to purchase the chapbook for $7.99  transfer to our Shopping Cart.

  

Now a Kindle eBook for the same price go to Amazon.com.

 

 

Copyright © 2007 Marianne McNeil Logan  

 

www.pathpublishing.com

path2@pathpublishing.com

Path Publishing

4302 W. 51st #121

Amarillo, Texas 79109-6159

 

                                                               WATCH SECTION

 

                                                                                Final Words

 

                                                             These final hours are precious ones

                                                                 while knowing end is near,

                                                              and I must hide my grieving heart

                                                                  and overwhelming fear.

 

                                                              I’ll hold you close, my hand in yours,

                                                                  while eyes are filled with tears.

                                                             How can you ever say goodbye

                                                                   to love of forty years? 

 

                                                             We talk of pride in grownup sons,

                                                                  in what they’ve done, and will

                                                              it’s much too soon to say goodbye

                                                                  because we need you still.

                                                      

              

 

                                                                    MOURNING SECTION

 

                                                                                  Facade

                                                             I’m tired of people telling me
                                                               “You must be very strong
                                                             to bear your grief the way you do.”
                                                               Why can’t they see they’re wrong?

                                                             I’m weak, alone, and so afraid,
                                                                yet still, I guess, I try
                                                             to fill my days with busy things,
                                                                but late
                                                                            at night,
                                                                                       I
                                                                                          cry.

          

                                                                                         

                                                                  RECOVERING SECTION

 

                                                                         Breaking the Chain

 

                                                The sonnet she had written about time

                                                that heals the heart still numbed by hopeless grief

                                                Till withered autumn leaf stabbed deep. Belief

                                                in words she wrote gave added strength to rhyme.

                                                One line said sleep had shielded during plight

                                                with healing powers found in slumbers charms,

                                                where I too searched for solace. Mystic arms

                                                of Morpheus still comfort me at night.

 

                                                The mourning grief and worries since his death

                                                have eased. I realize, self-pitys chain

                                                that blinds and binds was still creating pain.

                                                I will not let depression taint each breath.

 

                                                I will no longer let self-pitys hold

                                                and loneliness control. Let life unfold!

                                      

 

 

                                                    new learning process 

 

                                           struggling to find secure footing

                                                 with strangers in this

                                              crazy new world is a bit like

                                                      learning to skate

                                                         backwards

 

 

 

                                                        Change of Heart

 

                                             I'm taking off my wedding rings

                                             to pack them carefully away

                                             with other sentimental things.

 

                                             Can loneliness corrode heartstrings?

                                             Its time to live, and laugh, and play;

                                             I'm taking off my wedding rings.

 

                                             My world reflects what mourning brings

                                             as memories consume and prey,

                                             with other sentimental things.

 

                                             For far too long, a widow clings

                                             to life that used to be. Today,

                                             I'm taking off my wedding rings.

 

                                             Its time to live. Awakenings

                                             start heart to stir; let grieving stay

                                             with other sentimental things,

                                            

                                             for hope and faith give spirit wings;

                                             today seems like a holiday.

                                             I'm packing up my wedding rings

                                 with sentimental things.                                                        

 

                                                                                           (Villanelle)

 

 

 

                                                                  new hope

 

                                                            sorrow 

                                                    goes through stages

                                                      until one is ready

                                            to open arms and embrace life again

 

 

 

 

                                                          Solace of Beauty

 

                                         God gives us inspiration, hope in ways

                                         with beauty he has placed for us to praise

                                         like spiraling of showy butterflies,

                                         pinwheeling birds in velvet azure skies,

                                         or when he sends refreshing gentle rain

                                         so land is filled with joyous hope again;

                                         and silver moons cloud-cradled lustrous rays 

                                         bathe sleeping land with iridescent haze.

 

                                         Life isnt always perfecteven fair

                                         but sometimes, theres a perfect moment, rare

                                         as dew-dropped rosebud, clutched in trembling hand,

                                         to help the lost, the grieving, understand.

 

                                         Though one is gone, the daily life goes on

                                         encouraging with each new day at dawn.             

 

 

 

                                                         Renewal of Hope

 

                                           How can one stay immersed in grief

                                             when earth is wreathed in spring,

                                           when every blossomed bough holds birds

                                             that chirp and cheep and sing,

                                           and who can possibly be sad

                                             when every crocus lifts

                                           its furry face to hem the skirts

                                             of tattering snowdrifts?

 

                                           Its hard to be unhappy when

                                             the hills are wakening

                                           to burgeoned petaling of veils                                            

                                             that drape incoming spring,

                                           and how can one stay miserable

                                             when grass shows sheen of green,

                                           while trees flaunt limbs of finery

                                              in lacy velveteen?

 

                                          Oh, how can one still mourn and weep

                                             when flowers stipple slope

                                          to swarm through sun-washed greening fields,

                                             inspiring faith and hope?

                                          This is the season to rejoice,

                                             when land is blossoming

                                          with growth, new life, new hope for all

                                             in celebrating spring.

 

                                                           

  

About the Poet

 

Marianne McFarland was raised north of Rapid City, near the Black Hills of South Dakota. Her husband of forty-two years, Grant McNeil, died of cancer in April of 1991 in Amarillo, Texas. Two sons live in Amarillo, and one in El Paso.

She started writing poetry after her father’s death at Christmas of 1980. Her mother still lives in Rapid City. She has one brother and three sisters, including her older twin sister, firstborn in the family.

In March of 1994, she married Claude Logan, of Dumas, Texas. They spend much time traveling to writing seminars and cowboy gatherings where she is often a scheduled speaker.

She is a Councilor-at-Large for the Poetry Society of Texas, and has organized many writing activities for the Panhandle area writers. She helped establish cowboy poetry in the Pan­handle: Old West Days, monthly breakfasts at the Big Texan, and programs at Barnes & Noble. She founded and helped moderate the Senior Citizens group for twenty years; fifty-six members were published during that time.

She founded the Tri-State Fair Literary Contest, has encouraged area poets in readings on KGNC on National Poetry Day, promoted poetry readings at the Amarillo Art Center, set up poetry displays at “Taste the Arts” at Westgate Center, and organized many cowboy poetry programs in neighboring communities.

A well-known rhyming poet, she has won over 1,000 poetry contest awards! Three of her chapbooks have garnered five national awards and two Pulitzer Prize nominations.

Her poems have been published in several of the NFSF Book of the Year editions, which show the annual contest winners’ poems, as well as those of other state poetry societies, including Texas, Pasque Petals of South Dakota, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Minnesota. Anthologies include Galaxy of Verse, Midwest Poetry Review, Jessee Poet, Editor’s Desk, and Rio Grande Review. Her seasonal poems were included in one of the New Horizons Poets’ Timeless Shores, which showcased the works of four poets. Magazines that have published her poems include Good Housekeeping, Alfred Hitchcock Mysteries, Byline, Good Old Days, and others. 

In 1986 she was nominated for “Writer of the Year” by Marquis Who’s Who in Poets and Writers of Cambridge, England. Twice she placed in the Top 100 in Writers Digest’s annual international competitions. In 1990 she was the Texas winner of the Arts category in Colonel Sanders’ Senior Citizens Super Achievers Contest. 

Always a person of dedicated service, these are a few more of her many accolades: Hilton Ross Greer Award by the Poetry Society of Texas, the Heritage Award by the Southwest Cowboy Poetry Association, and the Lifetime Award from Texas Hi-Plains Writers in Amarillo.

 

    

 

From the press release…

 

Praise

 

“When we don’t know what to say to a grieving widow, these poems speak words of truth, comfort and guidance from the pen of a gifted poet who writes from experience. After the flowers have faded and reality sets in, this book will continue to bless and heal.” Vivian Ramsey Stewart, past Poet Laureate and former President of the Poetry Society of Oklahoma.

 

“The 63 poems in this purse-sized book share a woman’s emotions as she watches her husband dying, faces the loneliness, and finds new hope. Other women who have faced or are now facing ‘moments in mourning’ will find poems in the book to express their own emotions.” Madelyn Eastlund, past President of National Federation of State Poetry Societies, Editor of NFSPS’ newsletter Strophes, and Editor of Poets Forum Magazine, one of poetry’s leading magazines.

 

This limited edition is only $7.99 ― 68 pages, 4¼ x 7 (purse size), top stapled, 2.5 ounces. ISBN 978-1-891774-08-9

 

 

We hope you enjoyed the poems from Moments in Mourning. If you would like to purchase the chapbook for $7.99 click on the Shopping Cart below. Or purchase the Kindle eBook for the same price go to Amazon.com. 

 

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A word fitly spoken is like apples of gold in bowls of silver. Proverbs 25:11